Being a Type A Mom + Four Tips that Help Me

I never realized how much of a type A person I am till I became a mom. Being a type A mom can be more stressful than it has to be. Hopefully as I share my experience with you, you’ll be able to find more peace in the craziness that is motherhood.

So, What does Type A even mean?

In my first semester of university I took the required psychology 101 class, and sat through lecture after bland lecture about very basic and watered down pyshcology theory. One topic we learned about was the difference between type A personalities and type B personalities.

In this highly generalized (and not very current) theory type B people are the relaxed, chill, no agenda types. Type A’s are described mostly as individuals in high stress jobs who have anger issues, high blood pressure, and no room in their schedule for fun. Basically, I imagined Uncle Vernon from Harry Potter or another such portly business man always on the go, and constantly yelling into a cell phone. I was confused that neither type seemed to describe me. What I didn’t know at the time is that instead of being only two separate compartments, types A and B fall on a gradual spectrum where I fall further on the Type A side than I originally thought.

As a Type A Mom I have to manage stress.

I think one of the reasons I never realized how much of a type A person I am is simply because I have never had the same kind of career goals that are stereotypical of type A personalities. I’ve always wanted to be a stay-at-home mom, which isn’t traditionally seen as a high stress job.

When we moved in with my mother-in-law (who falls much closer to type B side of the spectrum than I do) I saw how easy it was for her to relax and enjoy the moment even without a schedule, a long to-do list, a meal plan, or endless projects. Without those things I feel stressed and anxious. I began to realize I might be more of a type A mom than I thought.

With this realization came an awakening to the strategies that help me enjoy being a mom.

These strategies aren’t about changing my personality. That would be silly, and it would take away from what makes me unique. They are the things that help me rock my type A mom-ness without letting my tendency towards high stress steal my joy.

However, it isn’t always possible to do any or all of these. I’m developing the ability to let go of stress when plans fail and organization isn’t available. I’m learning to embrace the chaos. If you are often stressed out by motherhood (and who isn’t sometimes?) these strategies may help you as well, but remember they are to help. If you find yourself stressing about implementing strategies that are supposed to help, remember that a little disorganization is okay (easier said than done).

1. Have a Plan

It seems that half of my stress comes from not knowing what I’m going to make for dinner, or eat for breakfast even when I’m starving and I don’t have time to come up with something. I realized that I can enjoy cooking and skip the stress when I have a very detailed meal plan for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Sometimes I don’t follow it, but it helps me to know I have a plan if I can’t think of something to cook in the moment. There are many stressful mommy situations that become manageable for me if I have a plan.

2. Use Naptimes Productively (Most of the Time)

I have realized that my type A personality causes me to feel more anxious and stressed when I don’t get much done during the day. While I shouldn’t measure the quality of the day by how many tasks I check off my to-do list, sometimes just simply being productive helps me be a happier mom. However, I realize that even though I enjoy being productive, on some days I still need to slow down and relax. It’s all about finding the balance that works for you.

pattern making

3. Focus on what I CAN control

Being a mom can be difficult for me because I like to input A and get B result. Motherhood is not that simple. Babies are complex and they are all different. I feel uncomfortably uncertain sometimes because I’m not sure what to do in so many different scenarios. If I can manage to focus on what I’m in control of (myself, my attitude, my breakfast, etc) then I can feel more able to let go of the things I can control. I’m still working on this one. 🙂

4. Learn to Just Sit

The last strategy may be the hardest for someone who always wants to be doing something, like me. It’s important for me to just sit with L and be with him while he plays sometimes. I get to watch and get to know him. I get to show him I want to be with him. Sometimes I struggle with this because I feel like I’m wasting time. But, when I make myself do it I find I can take in the moments that make motherhood so beautiful.

Being a Type A Mom + Four Tips that Help Me |stitchesandsunflowers.com

I hope you remember that I’m just a young mom who’s trying to figure out who I am as a mother. I don’t have all the answers, and I certainly don’t follow my own advice 100% of the time. I hope reading the things that help me will in turn help you. Writing them enables me to internalize them, and is therapeutic for me.

What are things that help you minimize stress as a mom?

Love, Jess

 

Disclaimer: I am not a phycologist or a doctor so I don’t pretend to make any recommendations as such. These tips are simply my opinion, and may or may not help someone else.

 

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old

Today I’m giving you a tutorial for an outdated skirt refashion. While you may not have or be able to find exactly the same kind of skirt, this tutorial is meant to get your creative juices flowing, and teach you techniques you could apply to multiple types of skirts.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

In the 1960s, my great-grandma was the mom to multiple teenage girls. Although they were a relatively humble farm family, she managed to dress her girls in fashionable sixties shift dresses. She did it by finding outdated dresses from the fifties with four yards worth of fabric in the skirt. She would take apart the dress and put it back together as a trendy shift dress.

Listening to my grandma tell this story fascinated and inspired me. What a fabulous use of resources and skill! This outdated skirt refashion embodies the same idea, although it’s a little simpler than altering a whole dress. While it does involve a fair amount of unpicking seams, it is worth it in the end to create a more professional look.

Materials:

Outdated (90s) skirt (mine had super poofy pleats in the front, plus it was too long)

That’s pretty much all the materials you need other than the usual thread, stich ripper, scissors, etc.

Step one:

Remove the front panels of fabric. Do this by unpicking the side seams and the waistband seams. By the time you’re done you should have completely taken the front piece (or in my case, two pieces) off of the skirt.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.    Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

Step two:

I unpicked the pleats and flattened them out (to eliminate the poofyness). Then I pressed the fabric to really get rid of those pleats.

Step three:

Measure the front half of the waistband.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers. Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

  • Add an inch for seam allowances. Then lay your front piece of skirt down, mark the center, and mark where the width you measured ends.
  • Cut your skirt down to the width you measured. (I took the pockets off my skirt first , which gave me issues later, so make sure that if your pockets add width to the front of your skirt you leave them on while you cut the front piece. )*

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

Step four: This is how I reattached my pockets.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

  • Pin or place the edge of the pocket (the one that used to be sewn to the front edge of the skirt) right sides together on the new edge of the front of the skirt.
  • Sew that seam, press, trim, fold back over and topstitch the same way it was topstitched before. I hadn’t cut the shape of my skirt perfectly, so I trimmed it to be straight here

update skirt 12Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.                                        Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.  Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

Step five:

Flip the pockets behind the front of the skirt. Now sew the side seams right sides together. Since there’s lots of layers I pinned them all together.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

Step six:

Sandwich the top of the skirt front between both sides of the waistband and top stitch where the stitching used to be (this is where I had to fudge a little).

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers. Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

Step seven: Hem the skirt in the updated length you would like.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers. Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.

Outdated Skirt Refashion: Give New Life to Something Old |stitchesandsunflowers.com

And…that’s how I did it! Now, go find an old skirt, take it apart, and put it together. Now you have a new skirt!

*I reveal my mistakes and my process for a couple of reasons. One, because my goal for this blog is to be authentic and real. Second, I want you to realize that even as you make mistakes, you can recover from them, learn from them, and become a better seamstress. Then you’ll be better prepared to avoid mistakes when sewing for others.

I’ve also added this tutorial to Made by You Monday on Skip to My Lou. Go check out the rest of the crafty links here.

Love, Jess

 

Outdated Skirt Refashion

 

 

I Won’t Tell You What Works for Your Baby

The internet is a parenting expert. Well, it acts like one at least. The great world wide web has plenty of opinions and suggestions to offer on how to raise kids. The voices giving this advice are many and often contradict each other. They don’t know our individual kids, they may not be qualified to give advice, and yet we still give their voices credit. Is this good or bad?

Let me share my experience.

Before I even got pregnant with my first baby, I had a very clear picture of what kind of a mom I wanted to be. I slowly gathered lots of research about routines, sleeping schedules, and open-ended play. Once I was pregnant, I only intensified my research. I wanted to know what other moms had to say about baby-wearing, birth, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, and how to soothe a baby. I was so determined that I’d be a “good mom.”

Fast forward to a month or two postpartum and I was STILL in agony from breastfeeding. I had seen multiple lactation consultants, worked hard to try to fix the baby’s latch, used a nipple shield and I was still in pain. No one could give me latch tips that were helpful. Other moms were done being sore after a few weeks. Everything I had read about breastfeeding was telling me that unless I was doing this WRONG I should not be having any pain.

I am not the kind of girl who likes to continually do things wrong. This, combined with the pain, sparked some tough emotional issues for me. I stopped listening to advice about breastfeeding. Eventually, I survived.

A few months later Littles stopped sleeping through the night. After we moved a few times, every attempt to get him to fall asleep by himself failed. Again….I don’t like to fail! We moved in with my in-laws and Littles started to be exposed to more TV. He often played with an iPad. A lot of those pre-concieved notions about how I was going to parent started to fall away, and sometimes, I felt guilty.

Despite it all, I still tried to find answers on the internet. The articles and blog posts I found always promise good results. They had titles like, “How to start teaching YOUR baby sign language.,” “How to transition YOUR baby from co-sleeping to crib,” and “Five steps to help YOUR baby sleep alone.”

I’m sure the authors of these articles felt they had expert advice to give. I’m sure that they only wanted to help. But did you notice how the wording of the titles assumed they knew what was best for my baby? How would anyone, even an expert, know any given technique would work for my baby? They don’t even know my baby.

Before I realized this, the fact that all of my well-researched knowledge wasn’t helping made me guilty and anxious. Was I doing something wrong? I am not a perfect mom, but just because I don’t parent like Pinterest thinks I should does not mean that I’m doing it all wrong.

I Wont Tell You What Works for your Baby |stitchesandsunflowers.com

I believe that we be careful of the words we use when we give advice to new moms. We need to be careful not to generalize. It can be harmful instead of helpful.

If I give you mothering tips, I won’t tell you what will work for YOUR baby, I will tell you what I did with my baby. I’ll do it in hopes that it will help you. If your baby is different than mine, please don’t be discouraged.

Do the research, but read with your own filter in place. Use that mama instinct of yours because you and your husband are the only ones who will really know what’s right for your baby. Please don’t tell yourself you’re failing if that internet advice, or ANY advice, doesn’t work out. Just love that baby. You will figure it out.

“To all mothers in every circumstance, including those who struggle—and all will—I say, “Be peaceful. Believe in God and yourself. You are doing better than you think you are.” —Jeffrey R. Holland

Love, Jess

 

How to Size Down a Button Up

Sewing can make it much easier to have good quality, classic clothes that are tailored to fit one’s own body. I find that as a young mom, refashioning my clothes lets me have a wardrobe that fits without constantly buying new clothes to match my current size. This tutorial will show you how I tailor an oversized button-up shirt.

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com
Before: It was wearable, but a long way from nicely tailored.

I used this tutorial from JLTFK blog: http://jltfk.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-to-tailor-shirt-refashion-mens.html. It is a great tutorial and I recommend checking it out, however, I ended up doing a lot of the steps differently for my tutorial, so I thought I’d post my version as well.

Here it is! Another way to size down a large button up shirt.

Step one:

Measure your arm length from where the shoulder seam should hit to your wrist. Measure from the base of your neck to the shoulder seam.

Step two:

Cut off the shirt sleeves and shorten the shoulder length of the shirt to match your measurements. The sleeves of my shirt were already the correct length, so I unpicked the  original seam allowance off of them rather than cutting it off.

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com     How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step three:

Now put the shirt on inside out and mark how much you want to take in through the trunk. I like to use pins, some people use chalk. Measure the amount you’re taking in right under the armhole and mark that 1/2 inch less* than that amount on the edge of the sleeve, tapering down to meet the cuff.

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step four:

Sew these lines, try the shirt on to make sure it fits well and then cut and finish the raw edges. *

Step five:

Pin the arm into the armhole, right sides together. Sew both sleeves in and finish the edges.

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step six:

Now try the shirt on again, iron all the seams and mark how long you want the shirt to be.

Step seven:

Cut the hem. To make the sides even measure from the armpit to hem marking and make sure they are the same length. Cut one side of the shirt, then fold it in half and cut the other side to ensure an even curve.

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step eight:

Press and sew the hem. Press up 1/4 inch along the bottom edge, then fold over another half inch. Sew the hem.

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step nine:

Try it on and enjoy the thrifted shirt that now fits you!

*Since you cut the arm hole slightly bigger, you need to take in the sleeve slightly less than the trunk for them to match up. I took them in the same amount and I was fine, I just had to do some fussing to get them to match up.

*You might be tempted not to finish your edges, but it makes a HUGE difference in how professional your shirt feels and how long it lasts. I am blessed that my mother-in-law owns a serger, which is the best option. You can also fold over and “hem” the seam allowances or add a bias casing on top of them. These take longer, but look the best. The easier options are using pinking shears or a zig zag stitch. These are better than nothing, but I haven’t found them to last as long, especially with cotton fabric.

Love, Jess

How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com   How To Size Down a Large Button Up | stitchesandsunflowers.com

How to Tailor an Oversized Button Up stitchesandsunflowers.com

 

 

 

The Worst Dressmaking Mistake I’ve Ever Made

A tragedy has just occurred. I made a super silly dressmaking mistake. One that I knew I should have avoided. Here’s how it happened.

A few years ago…

I took a pattern-making class and a sewing techniques class from an experienced professor who had working in both construction and pattern drafting for upwards of thirty years. It was so exciting to be growing towards my dreams of designing and making the perfect dresses that I could never find in stores.

I asked the professor to help me fit a pattern sloper (the base used to make all other patterns) to be a perfect fit to my body. Although I’d ordered the correct size for my body, and the measurements of the pattern were listed, she insisted that we measure the pattern itself to compare it to my measurements. “Never take the measurements for granted,” she told me. I kind of listened….but I didn’t really see the point.

Fast forward to this week.

I’ve had some cheap floral fabric (thrifted sheets or curtains, I think) in my stash for almost a year, and I’ve been dreaming up a vintage floral wrap dress for ages.

This week I finally got to work. I printed a free pattern, measured myself, cut out my fabric and took my sweet time sewing the best dress bodice I have yet to create. After I put the sleeves on I whisked that bodice into the bedroom to finally try it on, only to discover…

GASP!! The dress is tiny! It may be too small for even most twelve year olds. I look at the mirror in confusion and then it dawns on me. I didn’t measure the pattern. I assumed the sizing was the same as commercial dress sizes. I relied on a free pattern and a separate standard dress size chart! I took the measurements for granted! I died a little.

BUT, I picked myself up, dusted myself off, and now I am learning from my mistakes. I hope you can too. I will never, ever, ever again cut out the dress pieces without measuring the pattern and comparing it to my measurements first. ESPECIALLY if the pattern itself doesn’t come with a size chart. But, oh the price of that knowledge. *tears*

The worst dressmaking mistake I've ever made, and how you can learn from it. stitchesandsunflowers.com

So, please, take the time to measure the pattern! It could save you a lot of trouble. However, that in itself isn’t the only lesson you should take away from this post.

I am such a perfectionist that when I make a mistake like this it can cripple me and I’ll stop sewing for fear of ruining another project.

Here’s a tip for all of us:

Learn from your mistakes! Embrace sewing errors as a way to evaluate and improve. One failed project doesn’t make you a failure.

So, what sewing mistakes have YOU made we can learn from? Come on, fess up. 😉

Love, Jess

 

Baby Tee from an Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial)

If you have old tee shirts lying around the house and you’d like to make a free baby tee, this post is for you. All you need is a little over an hour of time, thread, and this free pattern.

As I’ve mentioned, we live on an island in Alaska with not many options for shopping. I suppose I could buy Littles a bunch of clothes at Wal-mart, but there isn’t much selection and I don’t like the idea of spending money on not-that-cute and cheaply made clothes when I have perfectly good fabric (read, “tee shirts”) here at home. It just seems wasteful and this mama doesn’t like to waste. BUT I do like to sew. I ended up sewing most of Little’s twelve month “wardrobe” (haha) from recycled adult clothes we already had.

If you feel the same, here is a pattern and tutorial for a twelve month size tee shirt which you can make from cotton stretch fabric or an old grown-up tee. Of course, if you have access to one of those wonderful large thrift stores where they sell baby t-shirts for 50 cents-1 dollar, go ahead and do that instead as well.

Materials:

One adult sized t-shirt

Free twelve month t-shirt pattern

Thread….And that’s about it!

Step one:

Lay the pattern out on top of the adult tee shirt. You can use the existing hem, or cut the shirt out of the middle.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com  Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step two:

Cut out the pattern. If your tee shirt’s design is too wide for the pattern, you have two options. You can either cut off the design or cut your tee shirt piece a little wider. As you can see, I chose to widen the shirt. In this case it’s important to make sure you cut the sleeve pieces a little bit wider as well.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com      Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step three:

Cut the existing ribbing/collar off the adult tee shirt. If you’re worried about making the ribbing too thin to be a collar for the baby tee, you can always unpick the stitches and remove it that way.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step four:

Using a stretch stitch or a serger, sew the shoulder seams and side seams.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

 

+Tip: Instead of using a plain zig-zag stitch as my stretch stitch I like to use the blind hem stitch, which is a stretch stitch with straight stitches and zig-zag stitches. This makes it so that the points of the zig-zag stitch don’t show in your seam from the right side of the shirt. In order to do this, make sure that the points of the stitch are faced toward the seam allowance, or edge of the fabric, and the flat part of the stitch is along the seam.

Baby Tee From Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) |stitchesandsunflowers.com
The points face inward the seam, and will show when the fabric stretches.
Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com
Here, the points face the edge of the fabric, or seam allowance, and the flat stitches line the seam for a neater look

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step five:

Cut the ribbing you separated from the original shirt to a length of 15 inches. You can measure around the neck hole with a measuring tape if you want to double check. Sew the ends right sides together to create a neck band.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step six:

Attach the ribbing. With the shirt right sides out, pin or simple line up the edges right sides together. Sew or serge around the neck hole.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step seven:

Sew the sleeves. Fold them in half with the right side in and sew the sleeve seams.

+Tip: I like to use the original hem of the tee shirt, but if you just sew your seams on top of the hem it can look sloppy and/or unprofessional. To avoid this I simply unpick 3/4 to 1 inch of hem on each side of the seam before sewing. Then, after sewing I can go in and hem that spot, imitating the stitches that were already there. It’s still not perfect, but I like it better.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com                    Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com      Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step eight:

Sew the sleeves to the shirt. With the shirt inside out and the sleeves right side out, pin the sleeve into the armhole with right sides together. Sew around the armhole.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Step nine:

Hem the tee shirt. You can use a stretch stich like I showed earlier, but I tend to not like the zig-zag stitch showing on my hem. If you’re more adventurous than me you could also use a double needle, I just haven’t tried one yet. My solution is….. a blind hem.

+Tip: How to sew a blind hem:

  1. Fold up your desired hem (for this pattern, 3/4 inches). Press

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com    Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

2. Fold the other way (like an accordion) and press with 1/8 to 1/4 inch fabric sticking out.

3. Set your sewing machine to the blind hem stitch. Use the stitch that looks the same as where this arrow is pointing. Don’t forget to also set your stitch width if you need to on your machine.

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com     Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

4. Sew down the hem so that the needle sews straight stitches onto the hanging-off-edge of the fabric and catches the fold of the fabric with the zig-zag stitch. Go slow so you don’t miss spots. The zig-zags are what will hold your hem together.

5. Press the hem back down to it’s regular spot. Here’s what it should look like:

Baby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.comBaby Tee from Adult Tee (Free Pattern and Tutorial) | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Now, you’re done! Enjoy your new shirt. If you have any questions or favorite baby clothes to make, please let me know!

If you’d like to share your finished baby shirt with me, share on Instagram with #stitchesandsunflowers or post it on our facebook page. I’d love to see them!

Love, Jess

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIY Baby Booties

When L was a few months old my mother-in-law bought him some magical fleece baby booties that STAYED on his feet! Even when he was three months old those twelve month size shoes would stay on his feet, due to the ankle elastic and handy adjustable snaps.

He recently lost one bootie, so I set out on  a quest to make more. My first attempt at copying the baby shoes left a lot wanting. They were baggy and the fit of the pattern wasn’t as snug, allowing them to fall off.

I played with my pattern a little, and came up with a way for you (and me!) to make your own magic stay-on-those-feet baby booties. These booties were made a bit bigger than the store-bought 12 month size so that they would fit L for longer. I’d say they are between a 3 and a 4 shoe size.

Download the pattern here. Make sure you get all three pages.

Materials:

Thick and warm outer fabric (I have used recycled sweater and felted wool. Fleece would also work)

Thinner inner fabric  (tee shirt scraps, thin flannel)

Elastic (two pieces cut 7 1/2 inches long)

Snaps or Velcro

Step One

Cut out your fabric. You will need two pieces of each piece in outer fabric and two of inner fabric.

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.

Step Two

With right sides together, serge the inner fabric to the outer fabric. Do this with all the pieces except the sole piece.

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.

Step Three

Sew the elastic onto the heel piece, tacking it down on each end.

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.     DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.

Step Four

Flip the heel pieces right side out and topstitch over the ends to keep the elastic in place. Topstitch two parallel lines on either side of the elastic to form a casing

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.    DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.

Step Five

Flip the rest of the pieces right side out and press. Serge the bottom/raw edge off all the pieces and serge around the edge of the heel lining piece. This will make sure there are no raw edges once you sew everything together. *If you have a really fabulous serger that’s can sew through really thick fabric, or if you’re using thin fabric you should skip this step and serge the pieces together in the next step.

Step Six

Pin the center of the heel piece to the heel of the sole outer and inner, with the outer piece sandwiched in the middle. It’s important that you do the heel first! If you are using leather, hand stitch with embroidery thread and a backstitch. If you aren’t using leather, go ahead and use your machine to sew it.

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.   DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.

Step Seven

Pin the toe piece around the toe and either hand or machine stitch.

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial.

Step Eight

Flip your baby bootie right side out. Add the snaps or the velcro. If you are making adjustable snaps, put multiple snaps on the bottom strap and one on the top, so only one snap shows when your baby wears the booties.

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial. | stitchesandsunflowers.comDIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial. | stitchesandsunflowers.com

DIY Baby Snap Booties-- Sew your own 12 month baby shoes that don't fall off. Free pattern and tutorial. | stitchesandsunflowers.com

Note: Make sure that you keep tabs of which side is the right side of the heel piece, otherwise you’ll end up with booties that aren’t a mirror image of each other like me… oops!

Enjoy your beautiful baby shoes that don’t fall off little feet! If you don’t want to DIY here is a link to buy them.

Also, stay tuned for patterns of different sizes!

Love, Jess